Rivaroxaban (68630-75-1)

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Product Detail

Mechanism:

Rivaroxaban competitively inhibits free and clot bound factor Xa. Factor Xa is needed to activate prothrombin (factor II) to thrombin (factor IIa). Thrombin is a serine protease that is required to activate fibrinogen to fibrin, which is the loose meshwork that completes the clotting process. Since one molecule of factor Xa can generate more than 1000 molecules of thrombin, selective inhibitors of factor Xa are profoundly useful in terminating the amplification of thrombin generation. The action of rivaroxaban is irreversible.

Rivaroxaban is an anticoagulant which binds directly to factor Xa. Thereafter, it effectively blocks the amplification of the coagulation cascade, preventing the formation of thrombus. Rivaroxaban is a unqiue anticoagulant for two reasons. First of all, it is does not involve antithrombin III (ATIII) to exert its anticoagulant effects. Secondly, it is an oral agent whereas the widely used unfractionated heparin and low molecular weight heparins are for parenteral use only. Although the activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) and HepTest (a test developed to assay low molecular weight heparins) are prolonged in a dose-dependant manner, neither test is recommended for the assessment of the pharmacodynamic effects of rivaroxaban. Anti-Xa activity and inhibition of anti-Xa activity monitoring is also not recommended despite being influenced by rivaroxaban.

Storage conditions: Store between 2- 8o C protected from light

Packaging: glass vials

CAS Number: 366789-02-8

Formula: C19H18ClN3O5S

Molecular Weight: 435.88132 g/mol

 

Method of Analysis: Based on: BP

Application:

Prostate cancer or breast cancer, estrogen-dependent conditions (such as endometriosis or uterine fibroids), and in assisted reproduction (IVF)

Like other GnRH agonists, buserelin may be used in the treatment of hormone-responsive cancers such as prostate cancer or breast cancer, estrogen-dependent conditions (such as endometriosis or uterine fibroids), and in assisted reproduction