Gonadorelin Acetate (34937-08-5)

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Product Detail

Mechanism:

Like naturally occurring gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH), gonadorelin primarily stimulates the synthesis and release of luteinizing hormone (LH) from the anterior pituitary gland. Follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) production and release is also increased by gonadorelin, but to a lesser degree. In prepubertal females and some gonadal function disorders, the FSH response may be greater than the LH response. For the treatment of amenorrhea, delayed puberty, and infertility the administration of gonadorelin is used to simulate the physiologic release of GnRH from the hypothalamus in treatment of delayed puberty, treatment of infertility caused by hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, and induction of ovulation in those women with hypothalamic amenorrhea. This results in increased levels of pituitary gonadotropins LH and FSH, which subsequently stimulate the gonads to produce reproductive steroids

Packaging: glass vials

Storage conditions: In an airtight container, protected from light, at a temperature of 2 °C to 8 °C.

CAS Number:  34937-08-5

Formula:  C55H75N17O13, xC2H4O2

Molecular Weight: 1242.36

Method of Analysis:  BP Monograph

Application:

Gonadorelin is another name for gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH). It is a synthetic decapeptide prepared using solid phase peptide synthesis. GnRH is responsible for the release of follicle stimulating hormone and leutinizing hormone from the anterior pitutitary. It is used in fertility medicine and to treat amenorrhea and hypogonadism
Gonadorelin is responsible for the release of follicle stimulating hormone and leutinizing hormone from the anterior pitutitary. In the pituitary GnRH stimulates synthesis and release of FSH and LH, a process that is controlled by the frequency and amplitude of GnRH pulses, as well as the feedback of androgens and estrogens. The pulsatility of GnRH secretion has been seen in all vertebrates, and it is necessary to ensure a correct reproductive function. Thus a single hormone, GnRH, controls a complex process of follicular growth, ovulation, and corpus luteum maintenance in the female, and spermatogenesis in the male. Its short half life requires infusion pumps for its clinical use